Haiti Travel Advisory: Haiti – Level 4: Do Not Travel
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Haiti Travel Advisory: Haiti – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Travel Advisory

December 1, 2022

Haiti – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Last Update: Updated to reflect changes to U.S. Embassy Port au Prince operational status.

Do not travel to Haiti due to kidnapping, crime, and civil unrest.  U.S. citizens should depart Haiti now in light of the current security and health situation and infrastructure challenges.  U.S. citizens wishing to depart Port-au-Prince should monitor local news and only do so when considered safe.

Country Summary: Kidnapping is widespread, and victims regularly include U.S. citizens. Kidnappers may use sophisticated planning or take advantage of unplanned opportunities, and even convoys have been attacked. Kidnapping cases often involve ransom negotiations and U.S. citizen victims have been physically harmed during kidnappings. Victims’ families have paid thousands of dollars to rescue their family members. Violent crime, such as armed robbery and carjacking, is common. Travelers are sometimes followed and violently attacked and robbed shortly after leaving the Port-au-Prince international airport. Robbers and carjackers also attack private vehicles stuck in heavy traffic congestion and often target lone drivers, particularly women. As a result, the U.S. Embassy requires its personnel to use official transportation to and from the airport. Protests, demonstrations, tire burning, and roadblocks are frequent, unpredictable, and can turn violent. The U.S. government is extremely limited in its ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Haiti – assistance on site is available only from local authorities (Haitian National Police and ambulance services). Local police generally lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents. U.S. government personnel are discouraged from walking in Port-au-Prince and other neighborhoods. Only adult family members over the age of 18 are permitted to accompany U.S. government employees assigned to the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince. U.S. government personnel in Haiti are prohibited from:

  • Visiting establishments after dark without secure, on-site parking;
  • Using any kind of public transportation or taxis;
  • Visiting banks and using ATMs;
  • Personnel are limited only to the confined area around the Embassy after dark;
  • Traveling anywhere between 1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.
  • Visiting certain parts of the city at any time without prior approval and special security measures in place.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Haiti.

The Haitian Ministry of Health and Population (MSPP) has confirmed an outbreak of cholera in the country.  The MSPP recommends that individuals adopt public health safety measures, including hand washing and drinking potable, treated or bottled water.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Haiti:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds. Do not attempt to drive through roadblocks.
  • Arrange airport transfers and hotels in advance, or have your host meet you upon arrival.
  • Do not provide personal information to unauthorized individuals (i.e. people without official uniforms or credentials) located in the immigration, customs, or other areas inside or near any airports.
  • If you are being followed as you leave the airport, drive to the nearest police station immediately.
  • Travel by vehicle to minimize walking in public.
  • Travel in groups of at least two people.
  • Always keep vehicle doors locked and windows closed when driving.
  • Exercise caution and alertness, especially when driving through markets and other traffic congested areas.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Purchase travel insurance and medical evacuation insurance ahead of time.
  • Review information on Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report on Haiti.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.