Please view this document from the latest updates in Haiti from our partners at tthe Haiti Health Network
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Please view this document from the latest updates in Haiti from our partners at tthe Haiti Health Network

Haiti Health Network Meeting Notes: Oct 19, 2022

REGIONAL UPDATES:

Ouest:

Fond Parisien:

It was reported that fuel was previously being purchased from the Dominican and

brought over from the Dominican border This is no longer a viable option as the border

is closed for fuel purchasing. This surgical center is now being forced to ration fuel,

reserving the little they have left to be used for emergency C-Sections and some trauma

cases. No autoclaves are currently being used because of the fuel crisis.

It’s been reported that door to door violence has been happening in some areas of Port

au Prince and is now starting to spread further out into the surrounding areas.

Croix-de-bouquet:

A 400-person compound serving handicapped children reported having no access to

diesel – they are rationing currently.

It was reported that no employees from the facility have suffered any physical harm

coming to work. There have been encounters with gang members where they were

robbed, but so far everyone has been able to arrive safely when they have been able to

come in.

This location is now running their generator for 1 hour each evening. They do divert

power to keep their ICU, children’s home and office online during the day, but the rest of

the compound is without power.

Water is available on campus from a well, water must be pumped using a diesel

powered pump and they do also have a water purifying system on site.

They reported it being almost 2 months since they have had any propane for cooking.

They have been using wood pieces gathered daily to cook and have recently resorted to

cutting down trees to cook. Last week they completely ran out of food, thankfully Food

for the Poor was able to bring in a delivery of food the same day they ran out.

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Reported that they hear gunshot regularly, day and night. 400 Mwaozo were in the area

yesterday and stole 4 motorcycles and fuel.

Leogane:

Reported that they are safe now and have no cases of cholera however the social

political situation continues and is getting worse. The hospital cannot send a driver to

PAP to purchase the supplies needed to provide care. They do continue to serve

patients 24/7 using a combination of solar power and rationing fuel they were able to

purchase several weeks ago.

Sud-Est Update:

It was reported that the Jacmel protests brought a level of violence unheard of in the

area previously. A number of gunshots wound victims were brought in and the last of

the fuel stock at that time was used to treat these patients.

Rice is unavailable now out of Jacmel. Food is very difficult to locate, no one is coming

to the market to sell. Tuesday was market day and there was nothing much to

purchase.

It was reported that banana farmers in the area have their crops rotting because they

cannot travel to PAP to sell their harvest.

Basic services are still available at the healthcare facility. Some fuel was purchased

from the Dominican on the weekend. Surgery is limited to emergency c-sections.

There was a suspected case of cholera in the area – St. Michell is the state hospital and

is essentially closed down. They have no fuel, no doctors able to come in, the

anesthesiologist is from PAP and cannot come.

Thiotte: Internet connection has been cut out and communications have been very

difficult. September actually felt like a normal month in the area. Both Natcom and

Digicel towers have been down due to fuel crisis.

$40 per gallon of fuel in the area for the time being. Hunger is prevalent in the area,

many are suffering.

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Jacmel:

Healthcare facilities reported being open, however it is very expensive for patients to

attend. Food and water are scarce. Last week, during protests, rocks were thrown at the

health center’s gate. Patients were being seen only from 8:00-12:00 to protect them

from the protests, as they were typically beginning in the afternoon.

Sud Update:

One organization reported that their mobile clinics have stopped, they were trying to do

these clinics on motos, but this is no longer an option. Getting medication has been very

difficult, even though flight deliveries. There is no way to get through on the road to PAP

at this time. Most of the hospitals continue to function, but they are all working with very

limited personnel and materials.

C-Sections are extremely difficult at this time. A small water bottle size container of fuel

is selling for $20USD.

It was reported that in the area everyone is just waiting for soldiers to arrive. “There is

no living out here.” There is no water, no food and there is no fuel.

Some people are saying they do not want American, Canadian, or French soldiers.

Russian and China flags have been seen during the protests.

Another clinic reported that they typically only see basic care patients however

emergency care cases have been coming in at a higher level and basic care

appointments are no longer happening. People are only coming out in emergencies.

Meds are starting to run low; they have had to begin distributing based on necessity.

Nord:

It was reported by a facility from Hinche that they have not been experiencing violence

the same way as the rest of the country, however being out in Hinche they are cut off

completely and supplies are extremely difficult to locate.

They had a 6 month stockpile of rice and fuel, but are now at the end of this stock and

do not know how they will replenish their supplies. They are still able to run their mobile

clinics, however they have had to reduce the number they do weekly by 30%.

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Fuel insecurity, water insecurity is rampant in the area.

Supplies are so low it was reported that one facility has no IV tubing or gloves available.

They have resorted to reusing gloves, using bleach to disinfect them.

Ouest: Lafiteau/Titanyen/Simonette area Update:

Gangs invaded the village of Minotrie/Lafito two weeks ago. The area has been taken

over. One facility reported caring for over 60 displaced persons at this time.

A clinic in the area is no longer operating as their campus was taken over by gang

members. It has been reported that gang members are taking over homes in the area,

throwing personal belongings of the homeowners out into the streets and moving into

the homes. There is a large population of internally displaced persons from

Minotrie/Lafito staying in Source Matlas and Simonette currently. Gun fire can be heard

in the neighboring villages around the clock. Food and clean water are scarce. Many

people are suffering.

Nord: Cap Haitian – Limonade Update:

Clinic in the North has been closed most of the last month. Thursday seems to be a

quieter day for protests. Clinic staff have taken advantage of this and been able to

adjust their normal schedule and been opening on Thursday and the weekends.

Fuel Update:

Fuel continues to be almost non-existent on the black market at this point. If you are

able to find fuel it is very expensive.

6000 HTG per gallon in Les Cayes

4500 HTG per gallon in Jérémie

2500 HTG per gallon in Miragoane

3000 to 3500 HTG per gallon in Port au Prince

2 500 HTG per gallon in La Plaine du Cul-de-sac ce matin (Carrefour Shada).

3500 HTG per gallon in Miragoane

CHOLERA UPDATE:

MSPP updated reports are available here: https://www.mspp.gouv.ht/

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Some suspected cases have been reported in other areas. At this point we are working

on collecting data on what preventative/treatment supplies are available in country.

Our preliminary results have shown that facilities are out of even the most basic

supplies like gloves and masks. ORS, Aquatabs, IV fluids and IV kits are almost nonexistence

in the country currently. There are several behind-the-scenes conversations

happening to try to locate items and figure out logistics. Nothing to report currently.